Combustible Preachers

Jeremiah saw a lot of this coming. All he had to do was lighten up a bit:
“ Come, let us make plots against Jeremiah…. Come, let us strike him with the tongue, and let us not pay attention to any of his words. (18:18)
Then Pashhur beat Jeremiah the...

Jeremiah saw a lot of this coming. All he had to do was lighten up a bit, and some of his trouble could be avoided:

Come, let us make plots against Jeremiah…. Come, let us strike him with the tongue, and let us not pay attention to any of his words. (18:18)

Then Pashhur beat Jeremiah the prophet, and put him in the stocks. (20:2)

When Jeremiah had finished speaking all that the Lord commanded him to speak…, all the people laid hold of him, saying, “You shall die!” (26:8)

The officials were enraged at Jeremiah, and they beat him and imprisoned him. (37:15)

They took Jeremiah and cast him into the cistern…. And there was no water in the cistern, but only mud, and Jeremiah sank in the mud. (38:6)

The prophet’s description of persecution includes verbal abuse, death threats, physical assault, and imprisonment. What compelled Jeremiah to keep preaching in the face of such severe backlash? How did he resist softening his message about the Lord?

If I say, “I will not mention him, or speak any more in his name,” there is in my heart as it were a burning fire shut up in my bones, and I am weary with holding it in, and I cannot. (20:9)

The word burned like a fire in Jeremiah’s bones. He was combustible with the glory of God. He felt as if he would explode if he didn’t speak in the name of the Lord.

O, for more preachers like this! For more Christians like this! May Almighty God set us on fire in the grace and truth of Christ Jesus, no matter the cost.


Evangelistic Prayer

It is no small thing that the apostle Paul, uber church planter, would ask the churches to pray for his effectiveness in spreading the gospel. I never had a course in logic, but I figure if Paul needed the Spirit’s help, then we do too.

Below are Paul’s evangelistic requests, summarized in four key words. We can’t go wrong adopting his requests as our own. We should pray for:


“At the same time, pray also for us, that God may open to us a door for the word, to declare the mystery of Christ.” (Col 4:3)


“[Pray] that I may make it clear, which is how I ought to speak.” (Col 4:4)


“[Pray] that words may be given to me in opening my mouth boldly to proclaim the mystery of the gospel.” (Eph 6:19)


“Finally, brothers, pray for us, that the word of the Lord may speed ahead and be honored, as happened among you.” (2 Thess 3:1)

Father, please open a door for me to speak of Christ crucified and risen. And when that door opens, give me the boldness to walk through it and the ability to make the good news of salvation clear. Finally, grant a receptive heart in the hearer so that your word may be honored through repentance and faith. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

A Quick 3-2-1 on #MeToo


The #MeToo movement is a horrific revelation about the prevalence of sexual abuse. As a pastor, it makes me wonder how many dark secrets are tucked away within my own church. For my own benefit, and hopefully for your benefit as well, here’s a quick 3-2-1 for consideration: 3 questions, 2 books, 1 prayer.


(1) “Where do I have power?”

Sexual abuse cannot succeed apart from power. The victimizer must possess, even momentarily, some measure of authority or control or influence or strength over the victim. Exhibit A: Harvey Weinstein. Exhibit B: anyone with power, which includes every one of us, at least in some of our relationships. It would serve us well to be aware of the power we hold in various contexts. Whether through the position we occupy, our credentials or reputation, our gender, age, physical size, bank account, or intellect, we need to steward the power we have over others for their good rather than for their exploitation. In what relationships do you have power? How do you wish to use your power?

(2) “What perceived gain would entice me to turn a blind eye toward sexual abuse?”

Honoring a friendship? Protecting authority? Keeping my job? Maintaining my income? Advancing the greater good? Of all I’ve read to-date, Joe Carter hits the hardest on this point. The whole article is worth reading. Here’s a relevant excerpt:

Would you be willing to turn a blind eye to accusations of sexual assault and abuse if it might benefit you in some way, either directly or indirectly?

Of course not. Unlike the denizens of Hollywood, we Christians have stringent moral standards. As servants of Christ we recognize it is our duty to protect the powerless and vulnerable from harm.

And yet . . . in the last election we had a choice between two candidates who have both contributed to the systemic abuse of women. One major party candidate had more than a dozen credible accusations of sexual misconduct against him, and had even been caught on tape bragging about sexually assaulting women. The other candidate had spent years aggressively covering up credible accusations of sexual assault and harassment against her husband, a former U.S. president. In both cases, the candidates attempted to shame the alleged victim into silence. Despite these actions, millions of Christians were willing to not only overlook the misdeeds of these politicians but were even willing to reward them by giving them the most powerful job in the world.

But that’s different, right? We had no choice but to cast a vote to support our preferred candidate, because otherwise our political enemies would have gained power. We had Supreme Court nominations on the line. We had important political concerns that could be set back for decades if the other party won. And, after all, the other side was as complicit in sexual abuse as our candidate was. We therefore shouldn’t be held responsible for making the best of a bad situation.

(3) “What steps might the church take to prevent abuse?”

From a satellite view, this question is relatively easy to answer: the church needs to speak up. It is good that we have child protection policies in place, but we also need to talk about sexual abuse, and not just on social media. We need to talk about it:

FROM OUR PULPITS — teaching the need to have new hearts in Christ; to fear the Lord; to value the image of God in others; to appropriate the promises of God in faith; to love the light more than the darkness; to bear the fruit of self-control; to love our neighbors as we love ourselves;

AROUND THE TABLE — among a band of brothers or a small group of sisters, engaging in down-to-earth, nitty-gritty, rubber-meets-the-road conversation in which we help each other keep in step with the gospel;

IN OUR HOMES — equipping our children to protect themselves and to be protectors of others;

ON OUR KNEES — asking the Father to uncover abusive situations in our church; to agitate the consciences of the guilty; to bring healing and restoration to the wounded; and to purify the hearts of us all;

WITH THE AUTHORITIES — reporting abusive situations to law enforcement without hesitation.

Admittedly, this list is pitched at a satellite view. It needs to be zoomed in and explored at the street level. Which is to say, it needs much more detail. But I believe it’s a good start at prevention.


One book I would recommend is Making All Things New: Restoring Joy to the Sexually BrokenDavid Powlinson’s counsel extends not only to those who are broken due to their own sins but to those who have been broken by the sins of others. His book is uniquely beautiful in applying the gospel to both people: “Jesus, the merciful, steadily intervenes. To the indulgent, he brings forgiveness, covering perverse pleasures with new innocence. To the frightened, he brings refuge, the name that calms our fears and bids our sorrows cease. There is pleasure and protection in Christ, God’s inexpressible gift.”

Another book I would recommend is Rid of My Disgrace by Justin and Lindsey Holcomb. This book is most helpful for the abused and those who care for them.


Heavenly Father, our shameful record of sexual abuse shows our desperate need for you. Please bring it about that your name is honored as holy, that your kingdom in Christ explodes into our mess, and that your will is done on earth as it is in heaven. Do this especially in your church, Father. Expose our hidden sins, bring us into your light, wound us that we might be healed.

Give us today all the resources we need to live sexually faithful lives unto you.

Forgive us for our lusts, for our sinful sexual advances toward others, and for those times that we have exploited others for our own physical gratification. And, Father, with all the empowering grace of your resurrected Son and indwelling Spirit, enable us to forgive those who have harmed us sexually. Whether victims or victimizers — or both — we want to be made whole in you.

You are powerful, Father. Please use your power to keep us out of any situation in which we will be sexually tempted. Deliver us from the Evil One, who would love to see our lives ruined as sexual abusers.

Thank you for the hope you’ve given us in the gospel. We can’t wait to be in your presence, completely and gloriously renewed in your image. For yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever. In the name of Jesus, Amen.






Monsters Are Real


Children are afraid of the dark; adults are afraid of the darkness. No longer do we tremble beneath the sheets, scared of the imaginary monster under the bed. We have matured, and so have our fears. Now we understand that monsters are real.

They have names, these monsters. They are called Unethical Boss, Pressuring Peer, Impossible Husband, Dissatisfied Wife, Ungodly Government, Angry Neighbor, Abusive Uncle. “My name is Legion, for we are many.” Our monsters are many, and scary. They are people whose favor we wish to have but don’t; they are people whose displeasure toward us is painful; they are people who pose a threat to our well-being; they are people who seek to harm us. They are people. We are afraid of people. “My name is Fear of Man, for we are many.”

King David understood the fear of man. Saul had raged against him, twice seeking to pin his body to the wall with a spear. Absalom, his own son, would betray him. Shimei cursed him. Sheba stirred up the northern tribes against him. Entire armies sought his destruction—the Philistines, the Amalekites, the Ammonites—just how many enemy encampments did David see?

How did David battle his fear? Did he do some yoga? Did he stress-eat? Did he go play golf? No. David looked at the Lord. He looked long and hard. He gazed. He sought. And what David saw dispelled the darkness of his fear and invigorated his faith.

The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The LORD is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid? When evildoers assail me to eat up my flesh, my adversaries and foes, it is they who stumble and fall. Though an army encamp against me, my heart shall not fear; though war arise against me, yet I will be confident.
– Psalm 27:1-3

The Lord is my light! Remember the times you have been helped by light—a nightlight as a child, a campfire in the woods, a flashlight in a cave, a candle when the electricity goes out. How relieved you felt once you could see! David felt that relief as he looked at the light of the Lord. His fear vanished. Your fear will vanish too, even more so since you stand in greater brightness than David. The light of the world has shone on you. You could not be safer than you are in Jesus.

The Lord is my refuge! God is the stronghold of your life, a place of safety. In him you are secure, no matter what monstrous thing your foe may do. Even should you be killed, not a hair of your head will perish.

The Lord is my defender! Those seeking to trip you up will stumble and fall. True, they may harm you before they’re on the ground. But God will see to it that justice is done. You can be as confident as an Easter morning that evil will not have the last word in your life.

As adults we understand that our childhood fear of monsters was unnecessary. The good news in Jesus is that our grown-up fear of monsters is equally unnecessary. Not because monsters aren’t real, but because God is. You don’t have to be afraid of the darkness. Look at the Lord. Look at him.



One of the Best Looks

One of my favorite performances of this song. Sy Smith is great. But the band! Are you kidding me? These guys are off-the-charts talented and super-fun to watch.

Trumpet – Chris Botti
Vocals – Sy Smith
Piano – Billy Childs
Guitar – Mark Whitfield
Bass – Robert Hurst
Drums – Billy Kilson
Orchestra – Boston Pops

Compassed About

Most evangelical Christians don’t need to be talked into the Trinitarian theory; they need to be shown that they are immersed in the Trinitarian reality. We need to see and feel that we are surrounded by the Trinity, compassed about on all sides by the presence and the work of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

Fred Sanders, The Deep Things of God