Breaking Good

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I don’t regret the 90 seconds it took to read the following Q&A on God’s creation and providence. I don’t think you will regret it either. If you are in Christ, everything is breaking good.

Q. What do you believe when you say, “I believe in God, the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth”?

A.  That the eternal Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who out of nothing created heaven and earth and everything in them, who still upholds and rules them by his eternal counsel and providence, is my God and Father because of Christ the Son.

I trust God so much that I do not doubt he will provide whatever I need for body and soul, and will turn to my good whatever adversity he sends upon me in this sad world.

God is able to do this because he is almighty God and desires to do this because is a faithful Father.

Q.  What do you understand by the providence of God?

A.  The almighty and ever present power of God by which God upholds, as with his hand, heaven and earth and all creatures, and so rules them that leaf and blade, rain and drought, fruitful and lean years, food and drink, health and sickness, prosperity and poverty–all things, in fact, come to us not by chance but by his fatherly hand.

Q.  How does the knowledge of God’s creation and providence help us?

A.  We can be patient when things go against us, thankful when things go well, and for the future we can have good confidence in our faithful God and Father that nothing in creation will separate us from his love.

For all creatures are so completely in God’s hand that without his will they can neither move nor be moved.

(Q26, Q27, Q28, Heidelberg Catechism)

From Miracle to Providence

“Miracle rather shakes up our mental composure, reminding us that this world does not just drift along on its own, but is the place where a great person lives and acts. And that person’s influence is not only local and temporary. The God who brought...

Miracle rather shakes up our mental composure, reminding us that this world does not just drift along on its own, but is the place where a great person lives and acts. And that person’s influence is not only local and temporary. The God who brought the plagues on Egypt and divided the sea must be no less than the God of all nature. It is thus that our minds move from miracle to providence. (John Frame, The Doctrine of God, 275)

I love two things about this quote. (1) I think it’s right that our minds move from miracle to providence. If God is extraordinarily in control of nature, then he must be ordinarily in control of it too. (2) The description of the world as “the place where a great person lives and acts” is beautiful. God’s involvement in the world is not mechanical but personal. And if personal, then purposeful.

One Grand Providence

To the dim and bewildered vision of humanity, God’s care is more evident in some instances than in others; and upon such instances men seize, and call them providences. It is well that they can; but it would be gloriously better if they could believe that the whole matter is one grand providence.

George MacDonald